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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
are accusing of -- us of injecting religion into plicts. i have no problem what the archbishop does. i have no problem with the evangelists do or what the priests on the left do. it didn't bother me that during the vietnam war democratic and republican governments were led by priests encouraging people to break the law in the adage of the civil disobedience thing. so our position, separation of church and state, pluralism, so no little kid with a minority religion of some sort will feel offended or left out or feel uncomfortable. but yes, prayer in schools, a voluntary basis. worked for many, many years until the supreme court ruled differently. and i'm glad we got this question. i think there has been too much said about religion and politics. we don't believe in denominationally 6 moving in. it wasn't our side that raised the question about our president, whether he was a good christian or not. [applause] so that's our position. separation of church and state, pluralism, respect for all. >> vice president bush, four years ago you would have allowed federal financing for abortions in cases
president. he's got romney's arms tied in the same way that the religion right has his arms tied on abortion rights, same-sex, the way the neo cons have his arms tied in terms of foreign policy. >> one question either the moderate or obama should ask, name one issue in which you plan to puck your party, one issue in which you plan to stand up to house republicans, one issue in which you don't plan to govern as a severe conservative as you described your record in massachusetts before you were describing your record as a bipartisan bridge builder. >> would he come out with a sister souljah moment on request? >> that could request. were you a severe conservative or are you the reaching over the aisle -- across the aisle kind of guy? which is it? but you've got to -- as i said before, you have to go at romney the person. it's not romney's policies because those don't really exist. it's romney the man that he's -- >> i agree. that's what i'm working tonight. let's take a look at the promise romney made at the debate last week about keeping his $5 trillion tax cut deficit -- new deficit neutral.
-- and this is almost inevitable, we don't talk religion in this country, we're not comfortable with it, we're a country of tremendous religious diversity and increasingly so, and we don't think it should be in any way used as a test, but what do you think is relevant to the world view of mitt romney in his faith? >> i think there's something sort of fundamental and carefully crafted by mitt's responses to questions about his faith. i think he feels it very deeply, but can't really talk about it. there's sort of a hidden he fee but can't talk about it. he keeps it close and i think it's altered the way he approaches conversations not just about his faith but about many other things people would like to know about it. >> all religions have, if you don't mind it, their weirdnesses, whether it's exorcism in my religion. every religion has different things. it didn't really add up to history. so what is it that he doesn't want to bring out that might be seen as relevant by voters. >> it's not so much as what's seen by voter, but the way i look at the religion with mitt was that i wanted to know what does fa
versus paul ryan. cnn special live coverage starts 7:00 p.m. eastern, 4:00 pacific. >>> got religion? four more americans apparently not. a surprising new study out on americans and religion shows just how many people are checking out a religious service altogether. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announ
worldwide providing an intersectional analysis of the ways race, class, sex alty, religion combine with gender to affect women's lives. today this committee is actively involved in the magazine in a number of ways. we suggestion topics for the magazine. we review books, we recruit experts to write for "ms.." and through a foundation grant "ms." sponsored writing work shops to train particularly women study scholars in various media platforms. and i remember one of those meetings where there were the older generation of us and the younger generation of us. and the older generation was i don't know why i need to be on northbound and the younger people were saying this is the way you communicate with your friends. and eleanor smeal said you all have got to get with it. so she brought us kicking and screaming into the 21st century and the magazine has stayed in the forefront of that. in addition, not only are we as scholars there working with the magazine but we're bringing the magazine into the class rooms for our students. "ms." has this wonderful classroom program. and "ms." has alw
. a civil disobedience, we studied the great religion of the world, we studied for what dr. martin luther king, jr. was all about and we were ready and we would be standing and at the theater were going on a freedom ride and we would be beaten. but we didn't strike back as a way of living in a way of life that is better to love than to hate. we wanted to build a love of community and be reconciled so this book is also about reconciliation to give you one example. i first came to washington, d.c. the first, 1961 to go on something called the freedom ride. 13 of us, seven white and 14 african-american. we came here on may 1st and studied and participated in non-violent workshops and i will lover frigate on the night of may 3rd someplace in downtown rest pete -- washington we went into a restaurant and i had never been to a chinese restaurant or had a meal at a chinese restaurant. that night we had a wonderful meal. the food was good, and someone said you should eat well because this might be like the last supper. the next day, may 4th, 1961, we left washington driven from here on our way to
than the politics, religion, sexual preference, something that goes to the very soul. you bought that? it is remarkable. >> do you still paint? >> not enough. it is one of the things i keep -- i have space to do it at home. i have all the materials to do it, but i am lacking the focus of being able to separate my work from my other life. that is one area in which i am weakest. >> if we saw you in your personal life, doing things that you enjoy more than anything else, what would we see? >> well, there are two kinds of enjoyment. there is the tortured kind, writing, but there is no greater kick, i find, than writing something, and no greater torture at the same time. it would be writing something or drawing and painting. >> what can you tell us about your wife? where did you meet her? >> i met her when i was london bureau chief. i remember the day, july 4, 1968. cronkite and betsy, walter and a betsy cronkite were coming to london. i cannot remember why. i had been invited to a july 4 evening. a friend of mine, the husband was american, the wife was british. the fellow -- walter had ca
is the congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or the free exercise and stay out of it and leave people alone when it comes to their religion obviously assumes the religion. they believe in god. so i'm not going to revise history to pretend that. i grew up in a religious environment and i am proud of it. i was into the priest. i'm proud of that. i would probably enormously angry right now. so i am grateful for my faith and on and on apologetic about it. >> this is pretty remarkable we started talking a little bit about how it has changed over time. we could have also added to the 19th amendment and women becoming a part of this part of the democratic inclusion. [laughter] but most of the amendments have made it more perfect. they got rid of it. >> ausley understand. >> it is pretty extraordinary. the constitution frees up every american to be eligible for public office, and there is no religious test and that wasn't the prominent feature of the state constitutions. a lot of them actually had religious tests. >> you have the establishment in religion. so, on a unde
control. >> they are infringing upon our first freedom, the freedom of religion by infringing on catholic chirts and churchs and hospitals. >> reporter: the fact is religious employers are exempt but it does apply to, say, hospital that is serve the general public. on president obama's proposed tax increase? >> people making $1 million or more -- . >> reporter: the proposal rolls back bush tax cuts on people making over $100,000 and couples $250,000 a year, and we found people commenting on the body language. >> i didn't like biden's reaction. and he is constantly smirking and laughing and showing his big teeth. >> he is comfortable and knowledgeable. he seemed very relaxed. >> the body language is so minimal. contrived. they're in suits, come on. >> reporter: 50 million viewers watched the debate compared to 70 million who tuned in for the joe biden-sarah palin debate four years ago. john fowler, ktvu, channel 2news. >> early polling after the debate show that people were split over who they think came out on top. a cnn survey found that paul ryan was the winner, but the numbers were wel
and not to judge people by their religion, their skin color, their financial status, anything like that, with the acceptance of who they are. the world is only this big and that's how it is, because that's how you were taught. if we were so fast to judge one another, not really getting to know each other for what we are. i definitely did something that we cannot take two and listen to. [applause] part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and develop our team. because this is a group of guys about how my brothers. these guys don't ever ask about personalities or anything like that. they just put you in there and expect to get along. i was the only every 10 men of the group. so i didn't really care about it all, all the details, but i'm so excited i got to learn about afghanistan go there. what i learned is that these guys are the most important people in my life. we were there to support and care for each other. it didn't take a long time before the personality differences melted away. my pool team sacrificed their lives. we were running a mission and they took me out and rep
. not ideology or religion. it is driven by desperation. yemen's live in $60 economies. in a region that is cut off from the rest of the world, where people are living on less than 800 calories a day, that makes a difference. it is a real concern about government corruption that is pulling people into the insurgency in yemen. not drone strikes, not jihad, not ideology. all of those things are used. the second thing i found in yemen, they resent the drone strikes. they have the image of the drones and the u.s. government is standing up a government that is not accountable to them. we hear this over and over. in the south and in the north. this notion that the u.s. is propping up a government that is not responsive to the population. it is fundamentally undermining our political objectives, even while securing our security objectives. neither one of them bears any resemblance to the facts on the ground. they are distorting our ability to understand the relationship between the instruments of policy and the actual substance of our objectives. our security terms and our long-term political objectiv
is not driven by a u.s. drone strikes. not ideology or religion. it is driven by desperation. yemen's live in $60 economies. in a region that is cut off from the rest of the world, where people are listening -- living on less than 800 calories a day, that makes a difference. it is a real concern about government corruption that is pulling people into the insurgency in yemen. not drone strikes, not the hot, not ideology. all of those things car use. the second thing i found in yemen, they resent the drone strikes. they have the image of the drones and the u.s. government is standing up a government that is not accountable to them. we hear this over and over. in the south and in the north. this notion that the u.s. is propping up a government that is not responsive to the population. it is fundamentally undermining our political objectives, even while securing our security objectives. neither one of them bears any resemblance to the facts on the ground. they are distorting our ability to understand the relationship between the instruments of policy and the actual subjects -- substance of our
that has ever been a belief in religion. but this time i'm going to say, too, the christian part of her obama's history. they made him denounce fatter than they say he is a muslim. i believe he's christian. i've been to his church. and i believe that is what he believes in and i was christian and i converted to islam because i fell for women because it was more protective of their traditional roles of father and mother were the mother was allowed to be at home and have children with a protection of the father. and i thought it was a very positive situation for democracy. israel, i don't think we should follow their lead. they do not follow the christian approach. when things happen to them, i believe that's going to be a problem for americans in the future and we need to make their own decisions, even if israel says they are going to withdraw their support from all of these things because i think they are divine people and i think that his religious falsehood and i feel that americans do not have to follow that abraham was for all people and he was for all peoples children. >> host: wha
going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of keep up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble. he had changed his position on the vietnam
african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation strategy at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote: what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v. wade? later that year applying for a promotion he wrote: i am particularly proud of my contributions to recent cases in which the government has argued in the supreme court that the constitution does not protect the right to an abortion. samuel alito then, samuel alito now. but the republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either, and we saw that in re began's nominations to the -- reagan's nominations to the supreme court. 1981, pott
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)